One Day in History

Knights TemplarOn Friday 13th of October 1307  – a day synonymous with superstition and reportedly stemming from this actual day - the Templar’s were arrested in France and tortured until they confessed to the rumours, slander and jealous fabrication.

King Philip of France, who was in fact up to his neck in debt with the Templar’s, jumped at the chance to pour fuel onto the rumours and he put pressure on the Pope to act against the Templar’s.

By November all Templar’s across Europe had been arrested and charged.

Every defense was quashed by King Phillip, who ordered they be burned at the stake in 1310.

Extract taken from A Poor Knights Tale, a brief view on the ill-fated history of the Knights Templar

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About Andrea Elliott

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Posted on July 13, 2012, in Spiritual History and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. All Templars Andrea? This is how history recounts it. What if history was written that way on purpose to protect many of the Templars that were spared or simply evaded capture. They had friends in high places as well as enemies. Intriguing! Da da daaaa. :)

    • Completely agree!
      There are reports of Templar lineage out there, and I for one believe.
      This re-written account of history is not touching on the possibilities as I think that is a whole post in itself……….just haven’t got round to it yet lol :D
      Thanks Stuart xxx

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